We the undersigned Palestinian individuals and groups express our solidarity with the family of Michael Brown, a young unarmed black man gunned down by police on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri. We wish to express our support and solidarity with the people of Ferguson who have taken their struggle to the street, facing a militarized police occupation.

From our families bleeding in streets of Gaza, Hebron, Jenin, Jerusalem; from the Zionist prisons overflowing with our political prisoners; from our endless refugee camps, ghettos and Bantustans; from our indigenous people living as second-class citizens in what became “Israel” in 1948, and our dislocated diaspora: We send you our commitment to stand with you in your hour of pain and time of struggle against the oppression that continues to target our black brothers and sisters in nearly every aspect of their lives.

We understand your moral outrage. We understand your hurt and anger. We understand your impulse to burn the infrastructure of a racist capitalist system that systematically pushes you to the margins of humanity; we support your right to rebel in the face of injustice.

And we stand with you.

The disregard and disrespect for black bodies and black life is endemic to the white supremacist system that rules the land. Your struggles through the ages have been an inspiration to us as we fight daily for the most basic human dignities in our own homeland against the racist Zionist regime that considers us less human. As we navigate our own struggle against colonialism, ethnoreligious supremacy, capitalism and tyranny, we find inspiration and strength from your struggles and your revolutionary leaders, like Malcolm X, Huey Newton, Kwame Ture, Angela Davis, Fred Hampton, Bobby Seale and others.

We honor the life of Michael Brown, cut short less than a week before he was due to begin university. And we honor the far too many black lives who were killed in similar circumstances, motivated by racism and contempt for black life: John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Tarika Wilson, Malcolm Ferguson, Renisha McBride, Amadou Diallo, Yvette Smith, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell, Kathryn Johnston, Rekia Boyd and too many others to count.

With a Black Power fist in the air, we salute the people of Ferguson and join in your demands for justice.

Rinad Abdulla, professor, Birzeit University
Susan Abulhawa, novelist & activist
Linah Alsaafin
Rana Baker
Budour Hassan (via shiseido-red)

The reason that the government keeps old Black Panthers in prison is not because they fear that they will engage in violence or to just punish them, but rather because they fear their effects upon the youth, who are seeking leadership and will fight.

Lorenzo Kom’boa Ervin  (via america-wakiewakie)
dc-via-chicago:


How to Suffer Politely (And Other Etiquette for the Lumpenproletariat), (Deep Matte Polio Digital C-Print, 2014) A series of aphoristic posters that explore the intersections of the (performance of) suffering with respectability politics. How are poor people policed to suffer in ways that do not disturb/make uncomfortable oppressive institutions or communities? How have poor people been asked to engage in impossible feats of optimism and perseverance in the face of monotonous cycles of poverty and a free market that leaves very few free? How is this suffering declawed of its indictment of oppressive legacies, systems and institutions through narrative framing both in mainstream journalism and other forms of popular media? What is the hidden labor associated with being a poor person who performs tenacity and superhero feats by either smiling through the pain of living paycheck to paycheck or working harder? This ongoing series of aphoristic texts explores capitalist messaging as well as the pedagogy of capitalism.

© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2014
(p.s. Don’t be a goon; please keep the credit and series description intact if you reblog this. Thank you.)

dc-via-chicago:

How to Suffer Politely (And Other Etiquette for the Lumpenproletariat), (Deep Matte Polio Digital C-Print, 2014) A series of aphoristic posters that explore the intersections of the (performance of) suffering with respectability politics. How are poor people policed to suffer in ways that do not disturb/make uncomfortable oppressive institutions or communities? How have poor people been asked to engage in impossible feats of optimism and perseverance in the face of monotonous cycles of poverty and a free market that leaves very few free? How is this suffering declawed of its indictment of oppressive legacies, systems and institutions through narrative framing both in mainstream journalism and other forms of popular media? What is the hidden labor associated with being a poor person who performs tenacity and superhero feats by either smiling through the pain of living paycheck to paycheck or working harder? This ongoing series of aphoristic texts explores capitalist messaging as well as the pedagogy of capitalism.

© Kameelah Janan Rasheed, 2014

(p.s. Don’t be a goon; please keep the credit and series description intact if you reblog this. Thank you.)

Next Saturday at the Sanaa Festival! ‘Reflexivity’ curated by Mambu Badu’s own Allison McDaniel. Featuring works by E. Jane, Naropa Robinson, Jared Soares, King Texas and Mambu Badu’s own Danielle Scruggs. August 2, 12-8pm. Come through!! #mambubadu #sanaafestival

Next Saturday at the Sanaa Festival! ‘Reflexivity’ curated by Mambu Badu’s own Allison McDaniel. Featuring works by E. Jane, Naropa Robinson, Jared Soares, King Texas and Mambu Badu’s own Danielle Scruggs. August 2, 12-8pm. Come through!! #mambubadu #sanaafestival